Alexandra Wilson – Part 2: Grief, Joy, and Returning to the Source

TRANSCRIPT AVAILABLE: Click to download PDF.


In the second part of our interview (first part here), Alexandra Wilson, of northern Wales in the U.K., continues with her radical approach to death and dying.  She talks about making peace with death, and about the force in each of us which wants to return to where we came from, and to find rest in the source of our being.

“When the fear of death dissipates, death itself is a joy. When the fear of loss dissipates, then loss itself contains joy,” Alexandra says.

Also, Alexandra and I engage in some heretical criticism of the Deep Adaptation philosophy.

I offer Alexandra the title “Prophetess of Doom,” which, upon consideration, she is willing to accept. “If I am a person who brings that truth to consciousness, which enables the process of grieving, such that we can collectively accept and be with the reality of what is, then I’ll take that,” she says.

If you haven’t read Alexandra’s extraordinary paper, see it here.

ADVISORY: If you are triggered by talk about death, be advised that Alexandra’s approach, though thoroughly compassionate, is unusually direct.

Alexandra Wilson – Part 1: Death, Oppression, and the End of Days.

TRANSCRIPT AVAILABLE: Click to download PDF.


Alexandra Wilson of North Wales, U.K., is an “End-of-Life doula;” that is, she accompanies people who are dying. She has a background in youth work, social policy and human rights.

Alexandra sent to me, and to the Positive Deep Adaptation Facebook group, an extraordinary message, weaving together themes of death, oppression, spiritual consciousness, grief and trauma, liberation, and the end of alienation (between peoples, and between humans and the earth). You can read that paper here.

In our interview, it became clear we were going “off the map,” to the places labeled “Here be dragons!” As it turns out, the flag of Wales is … a dragon! I said I would look it up, and you can see it above (on the blog). Alexandra says: “I’m very protective of the dragons, and they are of me.”

ADVISORY: If you are triggered by talk about death, be advised that Alexandra’s approach, though thoroughly compassionate, is unusually direct.

Part 2 of this interview is here.